Carrie

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I am an all-time fan of supernatural shows and movies, but what I’ve realized while taking this class is that story writers and producers will portray a woman’s emotions as destructive because they often connect their supernatural powers to their feelings. Shelly Stamp talks about this instance within her publication, Horror, Femininity, and Carrie’s Monstrous Puberty. She explains how films portray a woman’s biological clock as ‘monstrous’ and horrifying, and she uses the film, Carrie, to explain how filmmakers do this:

“While Carrie begins as the aggressive view of the fantasized male subject, through De Palma’s authorial camera movement and references to Hitchcock, Carrie ends as a woman’s nightmare. The point of view shift which takes place abruptly in the opening locker room sequence— from the omniscient masculine eye to Carrie’s re-verse-angle view—becomes indicative of the film’s endeavor to shift its perspective from male subject to female subject. Although the film documents the dread of the female body glimpsed by that first male voyeur, it attempts to characterize this fantasy as a woman’s” (Stamp 42).

Now, I agree with every aspect of Stamp’s analysis, but after re-watching this film and reading her theory, it made me think of the show, Charmed (the original, not the remake). I’ve been a Charmed fan since Elementary— I would watch it every morning on TNT before going to school. But at the time I didn’t realize how controversial it was in terms of diminishing femininity. The Charmed sisters had supernatural powers that were connected to their emotions, just as Carrie’s capabilities were. Though the Charmed sisters used their skills for good; they often became dangerous to their city whenever their emotions were over-heightened. If their emotions consumed them, others would become hurt, or they’d use their skills for personal gain (which was against the rules); and coincidentally, when Carrie’s emotions were heightened, her powers led to people being injured or even to people being killed. This idea of making a woman’s emotions uncontrollable and deadly when angered subliminally says that women are incapable of upholding any form of power (rather social or supernatural).

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